AGIUM


AGIUM
AGIUM
vide Agios.

Hofmann J. Lexicon universale. 1698.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • -agium — Second element of Latin words such as *ancoragium, *barragium, *berbiagium, *hibernagium, functioning as the equivalent English element age which gives a quality, and here a sense of right or privilege, e.g. *faldage. Cf. age …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • adage — noun Etymology: Middle French, from Latin adagium, from ad + agium (akin to aio I say); akin to Greek ē he said Date: 1513 a saying often in metaphorical form that embodies a common observation …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • foggage — noun Etymology: Scots, from Middle English (Scots) fogage, from Medieval Latin fogagium, from Middle English fogge second growth of grass (probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Norwegian fogg long grass on damp ground) + Medieval Latin agium… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • -age — Suffix which gives a quality to a word it is attached to, e.g. *courage. [< Fr. age < Lat. aticus] Cf. agium …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Altarage — The revenue of a church or *cathedral received through oblations to an altar. The Latin form was altaragium. Cf. agium …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Arrivagium — The Latin term for the toll payable by a ship for mooring at a dock or wharf. [Lat. arrivo = to arrive] Cf. agium …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Batillagium — The fee for hiring a boat. [< MdEngl. batelle = a boat or barge] Cf. agium …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Betagh — One of the customary tenants of Ireland who rendered a food rent. The Irish form was biatach, the Latin betagius (with variant spellings such as petagius), while betagium referred to the betagh s tenure. However, nativus was also used as a… …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Bordage — The tenure of a *bordar; services owed by one. The Latin term was bordagium. [< OldFr. borde = small farm, cottage] Cf. agium …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Carucage — Tax fixed on a *carucate of land, first imposed by Richard I in 1198; used only irregularly thereafter. The Latin form used in documents was carucagium. Cf. Carucate; agium …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases


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